Prevention and remediation of severe reading disabilities: Keeping the end in mind

This article addresses questions about instruction for children with severe reading disabilities in 2 ways. First, outcomes from 3 recent studies are examined within the context of a hierarchy of instructional goals derived from current theory about the processes involved in acquisition of reading skill. This analysis suggests that we still have much to learn about effective instruction for children with the most severe reading disabilities. The second part of the article reports preliminary results from a 2.5-yr prevention project in which 138 children received instruction by 3 different methods. The primary instructional contrast involved the intensity and degree of explicitness of instruction in phonological awareness and phonetic decoding strategies for word reading. Results showed a clear advantage in phonetic reading ability for 1 group of children at the end of the second grade. However, this group did not show corresponding advantages in word-reading vocabulary or reading comprehension. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Authors citation
Torgesen, J. K., Wagner, R. K., & Rashotte, C. A.
Publication
Scientific Studies of Reading, 1(3), 217–234
Year of Study
1997
Subject
Literacy
Program Evaluated
Lindamood Phonemic Sequencing (LiPS)/Auditory Discrimination in Depth (ADD)
Tutor Type
Teacher
Duration
2.5 years
Sample size
65
Grade Level(s)
Kindergarten,
1st Grade,
2nd Grade
Student-Tutor Ratio
1
Effect Size
0.69
Study Design
Student Randomized
Full citation
Torgesen, J. K., Wagner, R. K., & Rashotte, C. A. (1997). Prevention and remediation of severe reading disabilities: Keeping the end in mind. Scientific Studies of Reading, 1(3), 217–234. https://doi.org/10.1207/s1532799xssr0103_3