Ameliorating early reading failure by integrating the teaching of reading and phonological skills: The phonological linkage hypothesis

Presents a longitudinal intervention study of 125 children experiencing difficulties in the early stages of learning to read. Seven-year-old poor readers were divided into 4 matched groups and assigned to 1 of 3 experimental teaching conditions: reading with phonology, reading alone, phonology alone, and a control group. Although the phonology alone group showed most improvement on phonological tasks, the reading with phonology group made most progress in reading. Results show that interventions to boost phonological skills need to be integrated with the teaching of reading if they are to be maximally effective in improving literacy skills. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Authors citation
Hatcher, P. J., Hulme, C., & Ellis, A. W.
Publication
Child Development, 65(1), 41–57
Year of Study
1994
Subject
Literacy
Program Evaluated
Variations on Tutoring
Tutor Type
Teacher
Duration
7 months
Sample size
124
Grade Level(s)
1st Grade,
2nd Grade
Student-Tutor Ratio
1
Effect Size
0.29
Study Design
Quasi-experimental
Full citation
Hatcher, P. J., Hulme, C., & Ellis, A. W. (1994). Ameliorating early reading failure by integrating the teaching of reading and phonological skills: The phonological linkage hypothesis. Child Development, 65(1), 41–57. https://doi.org/10.2307/1131364